The book of tea

(Photo credit: The book of tea: Growing it, making it, drinking it, the history, recipes and lots more by Nick Kilby and Louise Cheadle is published by Jacqui Small LLP) (Image above shows the title of the book and the author names against an orange background with a white teacup and saucer)   Louise Cheadle […]

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Scottish local sports club histories

Walk around any town or city in Scotland and sooner rather than later you are likely to come across a sports club. Scotland is full of bowling greens, tennis courts and other sports venues often tucked away in otherwise residential areas. Similarly most community notice boards will have details of judo, karate, table tennis and […]

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Scottish Poorhouses

The Poor Law (Scotland) Act 1845 set up parochial boards in towns and rural areas and a Board of Supervision in Edinburgh. One of their purposes was to build poorhouses for those paupers who were not eligible for ‘outdoor relief’, which consisted of small sums of money given out weekly. The Board of Supervision published […]

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Scottish glass industry

William Cooper, crown-glass cutter, glazier, and stained glass maker to King William IV had a glass warehouse at 18 Picardy Place, Edinburgh in the early nineteenth century. He also wrote ‘The crown glass cutter and glazier’s manual’ in 1835, describing the history of glassmaking, the processes of glass manufacture and the different methods of using […]

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Plague! has arrived at the Library

I’m delighted to announce that our new exhibition is open! It’s free and will run until 29 May 2016. Plague! showcases eight contagious diseases that ravaged Scotland over the last 700 years, and explores the cultural history of society’s responses to epidemic outbreaks. We’re focusing on infectious diseases because of their devastating consequences for society as […]

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Quintinshill Rail Disaster

On 22 May 1915 one of the worst railway accidents in Scotland happened at Quintinshill near Gretna Green in Dumfriesshire. Five trains were involved: a troop train carrying soldiers from the Leith Battalion of the Royal Scots, a local passenger train, a Glasgow express and two goods vehicles. Over 200 people were killed, with a […]

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